A taste of the coast

In the mail today, The Hub and I received the confirmation letter from the place on the Outer Banks where we spend a much-anticipated week each spring. Every year, that letter and Girl Scout cookies keep us going through the messy end of a North Carolina winter.

Now I have something else to help me hold on: “The Outer Banks Cookbook: Recipes and Traditions from North Carolina’s Barrier Islands” by Elizabeth Wiegand. It’s a heartfelt book for those who love that little strip of shifting sand and the good things served there.

There are recipes for everything that comes from the water, from traditional dishes like Hatteras-style clam chowder (no cream) to more modern contributions such as Vietnamese Spring Rolls with Carolina Shrimp or Soft-Shell BLT using soft-shell crabs. There’s information on traditions including Old Christmas and Outer Banks windmills, even a few things I didn’t know about (mullet roe as “Ocracoke caviar”?) Weigand also offers step-by-step instructions for doing your own oyster roast.

Weigand is a veteran food writer who provides clear instructions in her recipes. The book has a nice mix of simple recipes and more complicated ones from coastal restaurants. My only gripe is that the fractions are a little small for my bifocaled eyes.

There are a number of recipes that I’m looking forward to trying, but this one tapped my urge for salty breezes and nothing to worry about but which book I’ll read. I’ll tuck that confirmation letter in my pocket while I’m making it.

Wasabi Sesame Tuna

1 tablespoon wasabi paste (mix equal parts wasabi powder and water) or to taste

1/3 cup soy sauce

4 tuna steaks, 1 1/4 inches thick

1/2 cup black and white sesame seeds

1/4 cup olive oil

An additional mixture of 1 tablespoon wasabi paste as a condiment

Cucumber Vinaigrette (recipe follows)

Mix together the wasabi and soy sauce in a nonmetallic bowl.

Place tuna in a shallow baking casserole and pour wasabi-soy marinade over. Allow to marinate for 5 to 6 minutes.

Place sesame seeds in a small, shallow dish. Place each tuna steak on top, pressing to coat each with seeds on one side only.

Heat olive oil over medium-high heat. when hot, add tuna, seed-side down; sear until seeds are browned, about 2 to 3 minutes. Turn tuna over and cook for just another minute, until tuna is still soft and red in center. (It will continue to cook when off the heat.)

Serve immediately with Cucumber Vinaigrette and additional wasabi paste.

Cucumber Vinaigrette

1 cup peeled, seeded and cubed cucumber

1/2 red onion, diced

1/4 each sweet red and yellow pepper, diced

1 red tomato, diced

1 tablespoon chopped cilantro

2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

3 tablespoons olive oil

Pinch of sugar

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Allow flavors to meld at room temperature for about an hour. Refrigerate any leftovers.

 

 

What I ate on my summer vacation

pan-frying tilefish

Despite having books that we had not yet read, The Hub and I reluctantly returned recently from Buxton on the Outer Banks. We do three things while we’re there: Read, walk on the beach, and eat seafood until we threaten to grow fins and shells.

We dug into enough steamed clams to pave a driveway. Grilled sea scallops were sweet enough to consider them dessert (until we dug into the bag of Oreos in our condo pantry). The mackerel must have been running that week, because it was the catch of the day at most restaurants we hit, along with some sea trout and bluefish. Mackerel and bluefish are the rare finny creatures that are not to my liking. But my patience was rewarded when we visited a seafood market with a mind to cook dinner. There it was: tilefish.

When I gush to people about this fish, they usually look baffled. Few people have heard of it. (I was delighted to see it at Chef & the Farmer in Kinston the week it reopened after a fire.) The white fish has a sweet flavor reminiscent of shellfish, because that’s what it likes to eat. It’s moist, and difficult to mess up when cooking. I kept things simple. I sprinkled the fillets with a little salt and Barrier Reef Seasoning from Savory Spice Shop, then pan-fried them in olive oil.

We also toted back some spiced shrimp that had been steamed at the market, and added some penne pasta and steamed broccoli.

Add beer on the side. Listen to the waves.

Waders and Pearls

This is certainly a formal occasion, by Hatteras Island standards. Guests are encouraged to wear wader books and pearls to this oyster feast on Saturday, Feb. 26 in Hatteras Village on the Outer Banks. Proceeds from ticket sales (a bargain at $10 each) will benefit the annual Day at the Docks annual celebration of watermen, which is held in September. Guests are also asked to bring non-perishable food donations for the Hatteras Island Food Pantry.

To reserve tickets, call Lynne Foster at (252) 619-0136. Besides the oysters, I’m told there will be two different kinds of shrimp stew. I never knew there was even one kind. Stay tuned; I’m trying to track down the story on that.